Uzazi Salama saved my daughter and I

The day started like any other. Ngitanet Lolmodoni prepared her children for school and went by her daily chores. She was nine months pregnant at the time, and at the back of her mind, she knew the baby would come soon. In the middle of the night, the mother of seven started cramping and knew it was best to go to a nearby health facility, Lolmolog Dispensary, and see her nurse who she fondly refers to as Shiro. Before Shiro came to the health centre, Ngitanet, like many other women in the region, would have stayed and delivered at home; something that would have worked against her as she later found out. “I went with my sister in law, and when I arrived there, Shiro took me in despite it being very late at night. I had on several occasions met with some Community Health Volunteers who had advised me on going to deliver in hospital. Also, Shiro encouraged me to also go for the antenatal clinics, which I did,” explains Ngitanet. The labour process was normal according to Ngitanet, but she became worried when Lucy King’ee (Shiro) informed her that she was bleeding more than usual. “I had told Shiro that I had six children, and the baby being born would be my seventh. However, I lied to her as I had had ten children, and the baby was my eleventh. I had lost four babies due to birth complications, and almost died due to over bleeding in one case. I thought if I told her, she would not agree to help me but I told her the truth later on,” adds Ngitanet. Ngitanet does not remember what transpired that night in an attempt to save her life as she passed out due to too much blood loss. “When I came to, my in law told me that Shiro had worked very hard to keep me alive. I was very tired as I had lost a lot of blood, but all through my stay, Shiro took good care of me. When I was informed that all the people who helped me had been trained through a project called Uzazi Salama, I requested that the team, including Shiro, name my baby. They named her Naibali,” she states. Her sister in law was also pleased by the work Shiro did. “She did not give up despite the beddings soaking up with blood every time she changed them. I tell everyone about it as it was a miracle. Also, it is important to recognise the Community Health Volunteers who encouraged Ngitanet to always go to hospital. We were told they were trained by Amref Health Africa in Kenya, through a project called Uzazi Salama, and I would like to thank them for their work. In fact, in our household, we are also challenged to become CHVs and help other people the way our sister was helped,” she states. Lucy King’ee, popularly known as Shiro in the area, is the facility in charge of the Lolmolog Dispensary in in Samburu County, Samburu Central sub-county, Suguta MarMar ward. “Ngitanet suffered from postpartum haemorrage, PPH, and it was my first time handling it. I was very lucky as I had just come from a training by Amref Health Africa and PharmAccess that taught me how to handle PPH. I am very grateful to Amref Health Africa and PharmAccess for equipping me with the necessary skills and confidence to save Ngitanet, who we now call mama Naibali,” states a smiling Lucy. Beneficiary Quote: “Through the training that Shiro got, and the presence of the CHVs, my life was saved and I am forever grateful to those involved in the Uzazi Salama project”


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Provide regulatory oversight on project implementation and Sustainability of project interventions

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Project donor
Enable mobile service reach in Samburu County.

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Programme & partnership management
Improve quality of health service in Samburu through implementation of safe care model
Health financing through Ambulance referral system.

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Learning design and implementation for health workers and community health workforce.
Improve data management for accountability. .